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How to tell you need to retire your ski

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Guys, I'm new to this excelent forum, but not to skiing. My dilemma is my 2004 or 5 Volkl 6 stars have hundreds of days of hard skiing on them, and I can't say there done yet. I sharpened them this year and they ski well. Understand, I ski as fast and carve as hard as anyone out there. (it's my only A game). A few years ago I demoed new race tigers, and they were more of a rail ride in the turns than my skis. I guess how long a ski holds up varies based on it's construction.  How do you tell they should become the rock skis?   

 

Tom

post #2 of 12

You have a carving oriented ski, it has hundreds of ski days on it and you can still tune it?  You don't tune it often enough. If you ski somewhere that has soft enough snow that you don't need sharp edges then you may never 'need' to replace it... you replace 'em when you feel like it.

post #3 of 12

There's no such thing as "rock skis".

post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by karpiel View Post

There's no such thing as "rock skis".



Care to elaborate?

post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by karpiel View Post

There's no such thing as "rock skis".



There are two types of skis...Rock skis and skis yet to be mounted. 

post #6 of 12

You still have an edge, the bases are in good shape, skis are not delaminating, skis are not bent, the shape is modern......then there is no "need" to get a new ski.   But often than the new ski purchase is not about need, more about want.   Look at the Shamelessly Extroverted how big is your quiver thread to see what I mean.

 

But hey if you have the money to spare, and want to try out some of the latest technology like HEAD's KERS system, then go for it.   I have 5 pairs of skis in my active quiver  they all look like new, but I "need" some new skis. biggrin.gif

post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
 want to try out some of the latest technology like HEAD's KERS system, then go for it.   I have 5 pairs of skis in my active quiver  they all look like new, but I "need" some new skis. biggrin.gif

God I missed him.
 

post #8 of 12

How to retire a ski!

 

Here are some suggestions.

1. Place skis base to base with ski brake arms held by an elastic. Look where ski bases touch at tip and tails. If NOT modern rockers the tails should touch  at 10 cm. zone. At tips area look if one ski tends to curve away from other.

 

2. Look at bases for de-lamination. 

 

3. Taking a magnifying glass look at edges (top and bottom for de-laminations)! Look very very carefully at tip area and tail area!

 

4. Look at edges to determine if they still "stick out " from sidewalls! You can still take out plastic sidewalls with special tool ,,but they are telling you,,,,,,we are "tired" and want peace soon!

 

5. With Posidrive screwdriver hand turn all the screws. If too loose,,,insert helicoils or,,,,,,

 

6. If more than 190 cm,,,,,,,,,,,donate to ski museum!

 

7. If Hexcel Blue Ice model,,,,I will give you $1, 000 for them!

 

Enjoy your new skis!

 

Respectfully,

Vist

post #9 of 12

In my experience, after about 150 days of use, skis start to become softer and loose camber.  Not an major issue on soft snow, but definitely affects their hard snow grip.  By the time my skis have accumulated that many days, the technolgy has advanced enough that a new pair is looking pretty good.

post #10 of 12

Hmmmmm, none of my skis make it into retirement gracefully. They either die a sudden death (delam, busted sidewall or massive edge destruction) or they just fade away not due to fatigue but rather being replaced by something I like better. I don't think I'd know when a ski just peters out.

 

Granted I live in the west and spend a lot of time skiing stuff with a decent amount of granite.  Heh! 

post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by xman23 View Post

Guys, I'm new to this excelent forum, but not to skiing. My dilemma is my 2004 or 5 Volkl 6 stars have hundreds of days of hard skiing on them, and I can't say there done yet. I sharpened them this year and they ski well. Understand, I ski as fast and carve as hard as anyone out there. (it's my only A game). A few years ago I demoed new race tigers, and they were more of a rail ride in the turns than my skis. I guess how long a ski holds up varies based on it's construction.  How do you tell they should become the rock skis?   

 

Tom

 

 

Two things going on here.

 

1) With hundreds of days on your skis they are probably exhibiting some material fatigue - i.e. less "pop" than when they were new, and the torsional rigidity is less than what it once was so their edge grip is lower than when new.

 

2) Ski technology has improved, so the new race tigers will be more grippy than your skis were when they were new.  Plus the Supersports were designed to be more "slidy" than full-on race skis.

 

So your six stars are not as good as new and the newer stuff is better than the six stars were when they were new.  But they still ski pretty well and probably will for several more seasons.  (I retired my 5 stars due to a nasty core shot, not because they were "done") 

 

Whether it's time to move on is up to you - I'd say hit the demo hut, try some new boards, and if you find that you like the demos more than the six stars think about buying new skis.  OTOH, if you don't find the demos more alluring than your six stars (or not alluring enough to spend the $$$) keep skiing on the six stars.
 

post #12 of 12

A usually unreliable source (Skiing Mag) said recently that a manufacturer put a ski into a flex machine, after the flex equivalent of 75 days of skiing, core began to show signs of aging (loss of resistance, lower camber etc.) My own experience is around 100 days I think I feel a small difference, but it's tough because we've gotten used to the change. After 150 days, for sure, and anyway, the edges are about gone (Whiteroom's point). A few times I've demoed a new ski where I have same ski, different graphics from a couple of years earlier (like the Head SS's). Given tune differences, also notice a small diff in energy, pop. 

 

That said, I owned 6* both in 175 and in 168. I thought I'd miss them, but didn't. Trust me, the "cross" designs of that period have been bettered. There are a bunch of all-mountain carvers out there that will make you forget your 6* in a run. Whether you want to plunk down the $$ is another story; skis cost more now...wink.gif

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