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Greg Stump - Page 2

post #31 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Freeride View Post
 


dbostedo-Back in the 80's Winter Park was divided into two areas Winter Park-Mary Jane. For what reason I don't know. Mary Jane was always known as the side to go to if you were the serious bump skier. WP/MJ turned out a lot of top ranked Mogul & Freestyle skiers over the years. With terrain like that it's no wonder!

 

That was 30 years ago when this filmed and it will always be one of those days I will personally remember. I had not watched this sequence in over 20 years and it brought back some great memories of the shoot.

*

 

It was late March or maybe even April, Soft bumps with rattlesnake lines and a damn fun crew of bump skiers, If you were 3-4 or 5th back in the line you couldn't see a damn thing, Slush was flying and you were going balls to the walls. That was trusting your buddies in front of you and keeping your foot on the gas peddle the whole time. There were some great times spent with that posse over the years. Glad to say I'm still friends with all of them and have had a chance to ski with a few of them again over the past 5 years. Thanks Stumpy for capturing and creating a new generation of ski films.  Now, if only the legs could still work like that!!!!

 

Neat - thanks for the inside info! :) (And I understand the WP/MJ thing... it was a bit of a dig based on the Pet Peeve thread I mentioned. ;))  

post #32 of 39
 
Originally Posted by Freeride View Post

 

That was 30 years ago when this filmed and it will always be one of those days I will personally remember. I had not watched this sequence in over 20 years and it brought back some great memories of the shoot.

 

Such great skiing, and so cool of you to share!

 

Thx!   Thumbs UpThumbs Up

post #33 of 39

Hey Freeride, when I watch old-school bumpers ripping aside from the various split-leg aerial maneuvers it looks a lot to me as if they might as well be on a monoski. Not that that's a bad thing, just that there seems to be a pretty heavy intent to keep the skis together and working as one as much as possible.

 

Also,  it appears to me pivoting/steering a flat(ish) ski is much more essential to what's going on than edging, although there's some of that as well.

 

As someone who skied that way can you comment on those two points? Would be interesting to get your take from the inside.

post #34 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Freeride View Post
 


dbostedo-Back in the 80's Winter Park was divided into two areas Winter Park-Mary Jane. For what reason I don't know. Mary Jane was always known as the side to go to if you were the serious bump skier. WP/MJ turned out a lot of top ranked Mogul & Freestyle skiers over the years. With terrain like that it's no wonder!

 

That was 30 years ago when this filmed and it will always be one of those days I will personally remember. I had not watched this sequence in over 20 years and it brought back some great memories of the shoot.

*

 

It was late March or maybe even April, Soft bumps with rattlesnake lines and a damn fun crew of bump skiers, If you were 3-4 or 5th back in the line you couldn't see a damn thing, Slush was flying and you were going balls to the walls. That was trusting your buddies in front of you and keeping your foot on the gas peddle the whole time. There were some great times spent with that posse over the years. Glad to say I'm still friends with all of them and have had a chance to ski with a few of them again over the past 5 years. Thanks Stumpy for capturing and creating a new generation of ski films.  Now, if only the legs could still work like that!!!!

 

Hey, Freeride - who are these guys? Looks like Kennett and Hattrup in front, you on the looker's left with the white glasses(?) or the guy right behind Hattrup (I think it's Hattrup, far right in the picture). Can't tell for sure who's who.

post #35 of 39

I wish we had Stump style movies still being produced. There is not enough levity in most of the current ski flicks.

post #36 of 39

GoldMember, Here it goes from Left to right,

Robert Aguire "Dogwood" (Yellow pants, white Glasses), Scott Kennett, Behind Scott almost completly covered with Blue Pants is Dave Bossard, The Wild Man flailing in the Back Jeff "Wiley Coyote" Koffman, Chris "Hatchman" Haslock, Bob Legasa, Mike Hattrup.

 

Jeff was nicknamed- Wiley Coyote because he always had these wild crashes like the cartoon character.

 

JC-Ski; Some of these particular bump lines were not real steep, that compiled with soft, slushy, warm snow we were all about carrying your speed ecspecially with one or two other skiers riding your ass literally almost on your tails through the section. It was about driving your tips through the troughs and up and over the bumps if you needed to scrub some speed. Granted if it were firmer conditions you would be seeing more edging but it was about keeping warp speed through the lower angle soft snow.

Legs tight are the way you typically ski the bumps, just easier to control your skis and your body when your hitting-deflecting and driving through the bumps when your a tight package.

 

Definitly technique has changed somewhat over the years, ecspecially since now they are competing in man made mogul course with Pro Bumps.

No matter what it's still damn fun and exciting to watch.

 

Thanks for the questions.

post #37 of 39

I think it would be cool if Stump did a remake of Der Weisse Rausch, the seminal ski film which obviously had a huge impact on him and many other ski filmmakers. I would love to see Stump and Plake play the Mutt and Jeff bumpkin characters who learn to ski from a book, and throw in some ballet moves in the process. These guys...

 

 

Since Stump was a young ballet champion I've wondered how much he might have influenced Plake's interest in ballet? Anyone know?

post #38 of 39

Back in those days, to compete, you had to do all three disciplines: Moguls, Aerials, and Ballet. Combined was one of the competitive categories. Most guys liked the bumps, some aerials, most tolerated ballet. However, there were always exceptions and some really excelled in ballet where they could spend some practice time and gain a podium. Odds are Plake did ballet just as part of being a freestyler while excelling in the bumps. I don't think Stump would have influenced him so much as they grew up and competed on opposite coasts. Hattrup actually introduced the two after Stump was already making films and Plake wanted to be in them.

post #39 of 39

Good points, and the timing backs up your assertions.

 

Regardless, would love to see Stump riff on Rausch, if only just just some select portions that are particularly memorable. And a slapstick ballet piece with him and Plake would be awesome - might even (re)start something!   ;)

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