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Snowboarding 'less deadly' than skiing, study finds

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

See  The Guardian for complete article.  Very interesting! 

post #2 of 14

See NSAA facts for more detailed information that the Guardian article was based on. If you look at the NSAA stats for the 2004/5 season, the number of skier days was about even with the number of rider days. Rider deaths were 1/2 of the skier death total. Rider and skier serious injury numbers were roughly equal.

post #3 of 14

Though most resort deaths happen on intermediate terrain it would still seem rational that since skiers typically travel faster on average and on more challenging terrain then the skier mortality rates would be a little higher.

post #4 of 14

The sentences to remember:

 

"Most of those fatally injured are usually above-average skiers and snowboarders who are going at high rates of speed on the margins of intermediate trails. This is the same population that suffers the majority of unintentional deaths from injury."

 

By the way, I still ski at high rates of speed on the margins of intermediate trails.  But I remind myself of the above when I do so.  My own personal theory is that it is complacency and wandering attention that gets most of the victims.  (Also, "fast" for me is probaly not as "fast" as it is for a lot of you.) 

post #5 of 14

Fund my study.................. and let me know the outcome you need............rolleyes.gif

post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by skimalibu View Post

Fund my study.................. and let me know the outcome you need............rolleyes.gif



Do you honestly think that the NSAA statistics linked above are a lie?

post #7 of 14

Unfortunately, the report doesn't break out the numbers based on gender so we really can't make a clear comparison between the two groups.  However, it appears that men may be more likely to take risks that get them killed or injured than women.

 

"Thirty of the fatalities were skiers (39 male, 6 female) and 15 of the fatalities were snowboarders (14 male, 1 female). The rate of fatality was .80 per million skier/snowboarder visits."

 

"Twenty-four of these serious injuries were skiers (18 males, 6 females) and 21 were snowboarders (19 males, 2 females). The rate of serious injury in 2004/05 was .80 per million skier/snowboarder visits."

 

Swimming seems to be more dangerous skiing/snowboarding based on the numbers.

post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1badknee View Post


Swimming seems to be more dangerous skiing/snowboarding based on the numbers.



Biking is also far more dangerous according to most comparative studies.

post #9 of 14

Ah Statistics - what do you want I can get it to you.

 

Example.  A probable sizable percentage of snowboard deaths are upside down in tree wells and probably has more to do with lack of education than thrill seeking.  And how many dumb skiers end up in tree wells but survive because they can get out of their skis.  Stats generally speaking don't really say anyhing accurately.

post #10 of 14

According to an article about the ski patrol who were training to respond to tree well incidents (recent Montana tragedies), ~90% of them couldn't get out unassisted during the training exercises.  Scary.  We made it a rule during our last trip to Colorado that your ski partner must be within ~30 feet of you at all times during tree skiing.  Line of sight must be maintained.

 

Statistics don't lie but most of the time the statements aren't specific enough.  We really need to know if there are certain behaviors on the slopes that are most likely to cause serious injury or death.

post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1badknee View Post

According to an article about the ski patrol who were training to respond to tree well incidents (recent Montana tragedies), ~90% of them couldn't get out unassisted during the training exercises.  Scary.  We made it a rule during our last trip to Colorado that your ski partner must be within ~30 feet of you at all times during tree skiing.  Line of sight must be maintained.

 

Statistics don't lie but most of the time the statements aren't specific enough.  We really need to know if there are certain behaviors on the slopes that are most likely to cause serious injury or death.



 

Tree wells aren't so much a CO thing, but just the risk of hitting a tree, etc. makes this a great practice, and one that's unfortunately almost never done.  Good to hear that you were doing it.

 

Stats are pretty cool things, properly used.  I would love to see the average credit scores, e.g., of people who've had serious solo ski or snowboard accidents versus those who haven't.  But, the good news is, as reflected, skiing and riding are pretty safe anyway. 

 

The swimming thing is worth keeping mind for the mandatory helmet (soon to be mandatory padding, too) folks.  They could help lower societal risks overall much more if they just tried to ban snorkelling, or at least abalone diving, since those guys seem to have a way with inhaling water.  And ban epileptics from going near open water.  But, most of us swim, so swimming doesn't seem as scary as sliding on snow.  That's where stats help out.  (And, no, I don't want anyone regardless of physical challenges banned from the ocean, the ocean is a really cool thing, I was just being some version of a wise-ass.)

post #12 of 14

If skiing is more deadly than snowboarding, does this confirm that skiing is more fun than snowboarding?

post #13 of 14

Yes.  biggrin.gif
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by arches View Post

If skiing is more deadly than snowboarding, does this confirm that skiing is more fun than snowboarding?



 

post #14 of 14

haha - seems like a rational conclusion!

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