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Cold Toes

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

I got a new pair of boots this year and I have found that I cannot feel my toes after a couple hours of skiing.  They get too cold and go numb.  I was wondering if i should get toe warmers or if there were any better ideas to keep my toes warm this season.

 

Thanks in advance

post #2 of 29

Man up!  Toes are overrated anyway!  duck.gif

 

Actually, I've got "cold" boots as well.  Most of the time I can tolerate it, but when that arctic cold front blows through I find I need some assistance to keep the toes from freezing and falling off.

 

I haven't had good luck with toe warmers. Although they claim to work in the confines of a close-fitting boot, they never stay where they need to when I'm putting my boots on.

 

I've had good results with BootGloves (neoprene boot covers). These claim to add about 20 degrees of insulation value to your boot and I think that's a pretty fair assessment.  Make sure to put them on when the boot is warm to keep the heat in ... they won't *add* heat to an already cold boot.

 

I've got a number of friends who swear by Hotronics or other boot heaters.  These can be pricey, but offer active heating elements right where you need it.

 

Either BootGloves or Hotronics are considered gaper-ish among some die hards, but I'll happily take "gaper" comments and head back out into the cold for some more turns while the die hards are trying to massage feeling back in to their feet :)

post #3 of 29

Have you been back to your boot fitter? The boots I had prior to my current ones made may toes cold and when I took them back they identified that the bootswere actually a bit too snug at the outer sides limiting circulation. Once they blew them out a bit the problem was solved.

post #4 of 29

Have had that problem for years on cold days and don't like it.  Often the best powder skiing is after a storm clears with cold clear air pushing out the clouds.   So many years ago went down to a dive shop and bought various scraps of neoprene.  Then with some study figured out how to best cut up the neoprene in order to piece it together and  glue and tape them on the toe area of my boots.  Has lasted intact staying in place over several years.  Not so easy to glue anything on to the smooth shiny surface of a boot and was too long ago to recall what I used on my Lange's so one needs to experiment.   Use the highest quality duct tape like Gorrilla Tape over the pieces of neoprene. 

post #5 of 29

cold toes:

  I found by putting heat pads on your socks are the best way to keep your feet warm on those cold days do not put the pads on your 

bare feet.

post #6 of 29

you sure your boots arent too tight? That was the problem with me and I used to get numb coz of that. i changed my boots to a slightly wider one and voila, all is good. 

post #7 of 29

Try Intuition liners.

post #8 of 29

Put the foot warmer on your sock and then put a piece of duct tape on the front edge and up over your toes and it won't slide when u put your boot on. 

post #9 of 29
Thread Starter 

Thanks every one I am going to try toe warmers tomorrow and ill get back to all of you

post #10 of 29

Toe warmers work.  Stick them to your insole and carefully slide your foot in, or do the stick to your socks deal.  Cheapest, easiest way to deal with those cold days.  I used Hotronics for year and they do work, but the cost, hassle, remembering to charge your batteries, losing batteries, etc. make them one extra piece of equipment to deal with.  They do work great however.  I used them while coaching all the time.  When you have to be out all day, they're the best solution.

post #11 of 29

I also find the toe warmers work, although I just tried sticking it to the top of the foot for the first time this past weekend and preferred it. Maybe this is what everyone else was already doing, but I had been putting them underfoot around the arches. Top of the foot - near the toes - is way better. 

 

I also make sure to change socks at the hill as sometimes the ones I drive up in get wet from the snow or the car or from sweat, and I put anti-perspirant on my feet as well.  

 

I have definitely found that some boots are colder than others - hopefully you'll find the toe warmers helpful. 

 

Elsbeth

post #12 of 29

Aside from the good advice above try changing your socks when you take a break.  Clean, dry socks can make a big difference.

post #13 of 29

Hi Newguy13,

 

 

     You could try using "Bengay' on your feet (not between the toes, please) and hands---it will improve circulation in the skin and muscles and keep them warm for long periods.   Plus it is inexpensive and works.  An "odorless" version is available or can be ordered from most pharmacies.

 

     The other possibility is, the boot could be causing compression syndrome on the capillaries (Blood flow) or nerves in the feet.  The boot could be too narrow in the fore foot or too low in the instep which will impinge the dorsal pedis nerve which will cause cold toes.  Seek out a local boot fitter to resolve these issues.

 

Mike

post #14 of 29

The bootfitter suggestion IS top notch. It solves so many problems. But there are so many mickey mouse suggestions to solving a cold toes problem. I guess boot heaters are cool. Though there seems to be some resistance on this board when it comes to adopting a quality Intuition liner.

post #15 of 29

Many good suggestions  - I will vote with bootfitter 1st to insure proper fit allowing circulation. Boot gloves have worked well for me and while I have not tried Bengay I do spray my feet with antiperspirant to minimize sweating. I only wear a thin ski sock again to insure not too tight a fit when buckled. As to Intuition liners I currently own a Dalbello Krypton Pro's replacing my Krypton Cross's both having Intuition liners. These have been the warmest boots I have owned.

 

Good look warming your tootsies !!!!!

 

Falcon_O aka Charlie

post #16 of 29

I agree with the advice to visit a boot fitter first. 

I had the same problem and found that the pressure points were restricting my circulation.  Some minor stretching/punch out work really helped.

 

Now on really cold days, I use these:

31RMAHQVB3L._SL500_AA300_.jpg

They are thin, shaped like a footbed, and heat the full base of your foot (from heal-to-toe).  They actually work quite well without adding too much under your foot.  And the best part is they last most of the day and only cost a few bucks.

post #17 of 29

I have tried similar toe warmers in my previous ski boots but found the warmth was limited due to the need to be exposed to air for the chemical reaction to continue. My boots were apparently too "air tight". When removed from the boots after skiing for serveral hours they were cold but became warm again after 5-10 minutes out of the boots. Does that mean your boots have good exposure to outside air which I think would contribute to cold feet? With my Delbello's/Intuition Liners the problem of cold feet has been solved without the need for toe/foot warmers although I do use boot gloves on very cold day and continue to use antiperspirant.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NeedToSki View Post

I agree with the advice to visit a boot fitter first. 

I had the same problem and found that the pressure points were restricting my circulation.  Some minor stretching/punch out work really helped.

 

Now on really cold days, I use these:

31RMAHQVB3L._SL500_AA300_.jpg

They are thin, shaped like a footbed, and heat the full base of your foot (from heal-to-toe).  They actually work quite well without adding too much under your foot.  And the best part is they last most of the day and only cost a few bucks.

post #18 of 29

I use Toe Warmers on really cold days and find they help, but not really the total solution.  My boots are snug and I suspect they don't get enough air to heat reliably.  Better than without them however.   I find the trick to keeping them from shifting when putting my boots on is to use a sock liner and a sock.  The Toe Warmer goes in between the liner and sock.  Works great. 

post #19 of 29


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by falcon_o View Post

I have tried similar toe warmers in my previous ski boots but found the warmth was limited due to the need to be exposed to air for the chemical reaction to continue. My boots were apparently too "air tight". When removed from the boots after skiing for serveral hours they were cold but became warm again after 5-10 minutes out of the boots. Does that mean your boots have good exposure to outside air which I think would contribute to cold feet?

 

No, I am guessing that I don't get very much outside air exposure in my boots.  I have Dobermann Pro 130's which are quite snug.

I expose the foot warmers to air for 5 - 10 minutes before using, and they will stay warm most of the day.
 

post #20 of 29

Never use the footwarmers... I had one in my boot one time and it was pretty cold outside. Funny thing is, it was so cold/there wasn't enough air in my boot that it didn't activate til I went in the lodge about an hour later. The thing then went rampid and gave me a nice burn on my foot (even though it was on the other side of my sock).

 

Try putting a piece of duct tape on the very front of your boots (below the last buckle and above where the crease ends). Helps a ton. See below picture.

 

mikes-boots-2.jpg?w=450&h=371

post #21 of 29

Only on Epic Ski will people agonize over edge bevels, and tunes. But completely ignore something Intuitions that are proven to be warm, and could improve the fit of your boot.

 

Seriously? Chemical heaters between socks?

post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post

Only on Epic Ski will people agonize over edge bevels, and tunes. But completely ignore something Intuitions that are proven to be warm, and could improve the fit of your boot.

 

Seriously? Chemical heaters between socks?



My thoughts exactly, which is why I go with the duct tape, even though it may slow me down by a half kilometer or so in the DH's ;)

post #23 of 29

Just re-post the Chopper's solution biggrin.gif
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post

Only on Epic Ski will people agonize over edge bevels, and tunes. But completely ignore something Intuitions that are proven to be warm, and could improve the fit of your boot.

 

Seriously? Chemical heaters between socks?

post #24 of 29

yeah, this is what the boot gloves do--plug the fold gap.  those with toe-warmers on TOP of your socks over toes keep feet warm for about 5 hours on the coldest days.  just curl you toes up on the lift ride... toasty!

 

_mark

post #25 of 29
Thread Starter 

I think I might go to a bootfitter next time im back at my local shop.  It is starting to look more like the boot than the cold

post #26 of 29

I don't like Intuitions, so here are my suggestions:

 

1) Make sure your boots fit right.

2) Make sure your boots are warm when you put them on.

3) Change into your skiing sox right before you put your boots on.

4) If your feet sweat a bit, change your sox during the course of the day. It's not just for Vietnam anymore.

5) Spray anti-perspirant also helps a bit in this regard.

6) If it's really cold out - pull out your liners, stick a chemical toe heater to the top of the toe box area on each one, duct tape it in place, then insert back into the shell. This way the heaters get plenty of O2 to keep heating and you don't even notice they're there fit-wise.

 

Intuitions are noticably warmer than most other liners, but I don't like how they feel. Most other peole don't care. If you're debating weather to get some battery-powered heat system or Intuitions, I'd go with Intuitions. But I'd try the six things above first. It's a lot cheaper.

post #27 of 29

I recently got intuition liners, and really don't notice them being any warmer than my foot had been before!

post #28 of 29

When I started skiing this am it was -29C, -36 with the wind chill.  Toes got cold.  My next boots are going to be electrically heated.

post #29 of 29

I recently got Intuitions and they've been pretty warm but they've also been very unbreathing. After 3 hours of skiing my feet get totally sweat-soaked (and then I feel pre-blister hot spots starting up).

 

Are they "warmer" via the same mechanism as wearing plastic bread bags over your socks kept you warmer when you were a poor kid growing up in the 'hood?

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