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Any tips? Photo don't give credit to the steepness of the slopes?

post #1 of 95
Thread Starter 

I tried taking photo from bottom up, and top down on the ski slopes.  But it always make the picture look flat, and the steepness gone.  Pictures I take make blacks look blue, and blues look green in photos.  Any tip on preserving the steepness of a slope?

post #2 of 95

Take it across the slope and concentrate on a tree to make sure you don't tip the camera.

post #3 of 95

Welcome to the difficulties of photographing skiers.  wink.gif

 

A perspective directly across from the skier/slope can help make it look steeper, although it's often difficult to get that perspective.  Another thing that helps is to take the photo from the side and include some reference point like trees or rocks to help show the pitch.  Photos from slightly above and to the side with trees in them seem to be the most successful in my own experience.

 

Overall, though, you pretty much have to resign yourself to the fact that the photo will almost always make the run look wimpy.

post #4 of 95

I try to include a feature to give a sense of the angle. do you think this one works? a friend took it, his good eye. IMG_0530 [1024x768].JPG

post #5 of 95
Thread Starter 

Wow that is a great shot.  Without the rock in the background it would look much less steep.

post #6 of 95

This is a pretty steep trail at A-Basin but it's hard to get the perspective.  I think the shadows and trees in the distance may help some.

716423122_290290b855_z.jpg

post #7 of 95


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Abox View Post

This is a pretty steep trail at A-Basin but it's hard to get the perspective.  I think the shadows and trees in the distance may help some.

716423122_290290b855_z.jpg



That makes it  look steeper...

 

 

post #8 of 95

Zoom out or use a wider angle lens.   Zooming in tends to 'flatten' perspectives and put everything on the same plane.

 

Zooming out emphasizes objects/subjects that are closer to the camera, so slopes that drop off farther away seem more far.

post #9 of 95

P1110056.JPG

 

I took this one looking down Corbet's Couloir at JH last Tuesday.  I chickened out getting any closer with the stiff tailwind.  I never skied it either.  Was never enough snow for me to consider. icon13.gif

post #10 of 95


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post

P1110056.JPG

 

I took this one looking down Corbet's Couloir at JH last Tuesday.  I chickened out getting any closer with the stiff tailwind.  I never skied it either.  Was never enough snow for me to consider. icon13.gif


That looks pretty wicked.  That is a back bowl; where?

post #11 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by skimedic13 View Post


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post

 

I took this one looking down Corbet's Couloir at JH last Tuesday.  I chickened out getting any closer with the stiff tailwind.  I never skied it either.  Was never enough snow for me to consider. icon13.gif


That looks pretty wicked.  That is a back bowl; where?

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/54583/corbet-s-couloir
 

post #12 of 95

2010_03_25-13_39_42%20DSC_0079_stitch.jpg


The above slope is about 45-degrees.  Doesn't really look it in the photo, although the dropoff from the tips of my skies is a clue.  (And guesses where it's from? :-)


Taking a picture down a slope flattens it because the angle of the slope is equal to the angle of the camera - in other words, the same as taking a level photo of flat ground.  And vertical features like trees don't give any clue as to whether they're straight up-and-down or not in relation to the photographer.  Even being there in person sometimes a slop feel much flatter than it is.  I've discovered that some terrain park features that feel like upward jumps when skiing them are actually just flat bits - which is apparent when riding the lift past the park.

Like mentioned above, shooting across the fall line, instead of down it, is your best bet.

post #13 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by skimedic13 View Post


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post

P1110056.JPG

 

I took this one looking down Corbet's Couloir at JH last Tuesday.  I chickened out getting any closer with the stiff tailwind.  I never skied it either.  Was never enough snow for me to consider. icon13.gif


That looks pretty wicked.  That is a back bowl; where?



Yeah, that's frontside, inbounds, and open at Jackson Hole.  Right in eyesight of the top of the tram for everybody to laugh at you when you wimp out. (like me)

post #14 of 95
post #15 of 95

Here is a slope in Mont Sainte-Anne that gives a good idea of steepness. Capturing the bottom helps provide some perspective.

 

IMG_0016.JPG

post #16 of 95

tough one for sure, but as suggested above, look for things like trees, shadows other skiers and such that give perspective.  Here's an example of where I used the ski's hanging over the edge of this run and the trees giving you some visual clues as to the drop.  hard with whites:

 

5348341862_ac648c126b_z.jpg

post #17 of 95

Here is an example that was taken by RachelV at Squaw

First photo is of me (skier on lookers right) 

Second photo is from her same vantage point looking out over Lake Tahoe.

IMHO the first one doesn't give credit to the steepness, but the second one clearly shows just how steep it is.

Dropping into this was a bit intimidating but totally doable and tons of fun


Rachel took this pic from the same vantage point to get an idea of the beauty that surrounded us while we were taking it to the next level.

post #18 of 95

sorry to post:  I can't edit mine... 

 

I also use 16:9 to help give better perspective.

post #19 of 95
I bring a large snow covered rock with me, toss it out where I want to shoot and it seems to help:

500

This seems to work too. Not sure why, but maybe because you can see the ground below:

500


 

post #20 of 95

I like the shots that show a skier edging across the fall line, the pitch so steep you can poke your hand into the snow. . awesome Carvemeister. where are you? that looks 50 degrees to me. are you coming from above or around the corner? great shot.

 

Also, when the branches on the uphill side of the tree are into the slope, it's steep, that's vague sorry, the tree being vertical (90 degrees) shows the angle of the snow from that.

 

Nice Trish, Slot? pretty good image for flat light where it's almost impossible to show anything. you look completely relaxed, which belies the steepnesswink.gif

post #21 of 95

TC- Is that Slot?  Looks like it.  I love that run.  

 

Carvemeister- great shot.  where is this? 

 

 

Here is a contribution to the photo stoke thread (Extra Chute at Squaw, the skier is not me):

791758799_S94UR-L.jpg

 

 

To me the first Davluri's shot (dropping into the Palisades, is it Main or Extra?) wins the prize 

post #22 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri 
I like the shots that show a skier edging across the fall line, the pitch so steep you can poke your hand into the snow. . awesome Carvemeister. where are you? that looks 50 degrees to me. are you coming from above or around the corner? great shot.

That's my friend Steve in the upper photo. I took this a few years back near the top of Feuz Bowl at Kicking Horse. Steve was pretty much skiing the fall line and turned hard across it toward me. Truth is, the camera was tilted a bit (another secret trick wink.gif), but not that much.

2nd photo is Richie, skiers left a hundred yards or so in the same bowl.

 

 

 

post #23 of 95

Also, learn it from the people who do it for living, (I hope it is OK to relink a photo from UnofficalSquaw and Ryan Salm, not the full credit given).  This is probably the mother of all steep lines, Eagles Nest at Squaw.    BTW, does anyone has a thumbnail of that famous photo of Shane on the Eagles Nest that used to hang in the Starbucks at the Village?  

 

Adam-R_Eagles-Nest_0868.jpg

post #24 of 95
Sometimes the long shot can work too. More from KH, but not anybody in my group of flatlanders:

500

 

post #25 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

I like the shots that show a skier edging across the fall line, the pitch so steep you can poke your hand into the snow. . awesome Carvemeister. where are you? that looks 50 degrees to me. are you coming from above or around the corner? great shot.

 

Also, when the branches on the uphill side of the tree are into the slope, it's steep, that's vague sorry, the tree being vertical (90 degrees) shows the angle of the snow from that.

 

Nice Trish, Slot? pretty good image for flat light where it's almost impossible to show anything. you look completely relaxed, which belies the steepnesswink.gif



 


To answer both of you, yes its Slot.  Squaw has some incredible terrain to practice steep line photography wink.gif

Quote:


Originally Posted by alexzn View Post

TC- Is that Slot?  Looks like it.  I love that run.  

 

Carvemeister- great shot.  where is this? 

 

 

Here is a contribution to the photo stoke thread (Extra Chute at Squaw, the skier is not me):

791758799_S94UR-L.jpg

 

 

To me the first Davluri's shot (dropping into the Palisades, is it Main or Extra?) wins the prize 

post #26 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
To answer both of you, yes its Slot.  Squaw has some incredible terrain to practice steep line photography wink.gif

Another suggestion to practice steep terrain photography/skiing is Funnel off the Emigrant chair.  The more skiers left you get, the steeper it becomes, so you can dial in the angle that you like.  
 

post #27 of 95



Skimedic13, Corbets is not in or on top of a back bowl.  Here is a picture taken from the Tram on the ride up.   Epic Gathering 2 yrs ago.

 

 

IMG_0187.JPG

Quote:
Originally Posted by skimedic13 View Post


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post

P1110056.JPG

 

I took this one looking down Corbet's Couloir at JH last Tuesday.  I chickened out getting any closer with the stiff tailwind.  I never skied it either.  Was never enough snow for me to consider. icon13.gif


That looks pretty wicked.  That is a back bowl; where?

post #28 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post



Skimedic13, Corbets is not in or on top of a back bowl.  Here is a picture taken from the Tram on the ride up.   Epic Gathering 2 yrs ago.

 

 

IMG_0187.JPG

 

 

The wide one is Corbets. The small chute to the left is S & S.  At work I saw the most incredible ski photo ever of someone hucking S & S.  Makes

Corbets look easy.  The guy didn't even ski.  I'd die to get a copy but it's out of print.
 

post #29 of 95


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mdskier View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post



Skimedic13, Corbets is not in or on top of a back bowl.  Here is a picture taken from the Tram on the ride up.   Epic Gathering 2 yrs ago.

 

 

IMG_0187.JPG

 

 

The wide one is Corbets. The small chute to the left is S & S.  At work I saw the most incredible ski photo ever of someone hucking S & S.  Makes

Corbets look easy.  The guy didn't even ski.  I'd die to get a copy but it's out of print.
 

see the chute just under the tower, I think it's Cajun Couloir. the real shot is Eric Rohnert dropping his poles in preparation to ski b.a.s.e. it, a poster ad for Dynastar Legend Pro Rider, that's the picture I like. I have the poster and that looks like it. Never been to Jackson, so if I'm mistaken, pls straighten it out.

post #30 of 95

Yes that is the Cajun Couloir.  It was named for a man from Baton Rouge LA who skied into it and was killed during a white out.  One of his skis was lodged in the rocks for weeks after the accident.  Around here it's almost never a good idea to get something named after you.

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