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How often do you fall? - Page 7

post #181 of 265

Im falling about 2-3 times a day haha

i often ski out of my comfort zone with better skiiers than me tho

post #182 of 265

I fall about half the time I push, especially on jumps and hits. Skiing is beautiful, I can huck myself about 8 feet in to the air and if I don't stomp, basically nothing happens because you have pow most times to cusion your fall. I fell once going about 25 mph because I was bucked over by a large mogul I wasn't expecting after turning the corner around a tree and I did a few summersaults, one ski fell off where I stopped after rolling and the other was like half way in the snow about 30 feet up the mountain. I was surprized because I felt litterally no pain.

 

Motocross, you fall and your done lol

post #183 of 265

How does ice soften up?

post #184 of 265
Thread Starter 

Today one fall, demo'ing the Volkl Kendos when I tried to squeeze thru the willows.
 

Quote:

 

@Ridohan...not sure what you mean about skiing being more conservative these days.  I would argue just the opposite.  The sport has just changed and progressed.  The days of 200+cm straight skis and throwing daffy's and backscratcher's are over.  Don't get me wrong, they were a lot of fun!  These days the sport has progressed into the freeski movement.  Which has led to the creation of wide skis as well as more people venturing into the back and slack country.  I've skied for 30 years and never ventured off piste until about 5-6 yrs ago.  Didnt even know that type of terrain existed at the mountains i was skiing.  What has also evolved in the gear.  So many people i know are taking avy courses, buying and using beacons, etc.  In my opinion the sport is gnarlier then ever.


Yeah that may be true, and I'm glad to hear it.  My current impression is limited, kind of like opening a time capsule,  to coming back to my home hill after 25 years, and it really comes down to --- no serious bumps.  When I left home I thought this was a regional phenomenon -- I couldn't find many good lines in the 90's in the PNW, but could upon my rare visits to CO and Utah and Sun Valley.

 

Definitely noticed the sport progress for big mountain skiing, but I'm not much of a judge of how many people are doing it.  In the 80's I was a fan of the earlier euro extreme skiers such as Saudan, Anselme Baud and Vallencant -- not so much the big huckers like Schmidt -- and in the 1990s in the PNW the volcanoes were common targets for lots of skier/mountaineers on randonnee.  I expect that they still are.

 

But on the average slopes like here on my home mountain, there really isn't any challenging terrain for the advanced skier now that there aren't any serious bumps.  Any decent skier can ski all of it, even more so I am finding on the new equipment (and that is great), while back in the day you could have world class bumps at medium size resorts that would test the mettle of just about any skier.

 

I'm guessing that the sport is really progressing, and is not at all conservative, for dedicated skiers in the handful of big terrain resorts in the U.S., but on the average mountain not so much.  And most skiers do most of their skiing on the average mountain.  But hey, really, I have been under a rock and will be glad to learn otherwise.

post #185 of 265

For some reason I always fall the first day of the season....Its becoming a trend. Other then that I fall maybe 3-5 times a season (I was skiing 50 plus days a year then. Now, I got 2 ski days in for this season.....I fell once.

post #186 of 265

I've always been from the "if you don't fall at least once a day then you're not trying hard enough" school, but over the past 3 years or so I had fallen very little...call it getting more cautious, comfortable, dare I say <older>... whatever. 

 

Then I went to ESA in Stowe this past December and everything changed!  I think I fell about 8 times over that weekend and have been falling 1 or 2 times a day consistently since then.  I feel that that's because I've been challenging myself to try different things and improve my technique; to become a more offensive skier, rather than simply sticking with what I know (a somewhat defensive style).  It's amazing how much just trying to change a few small things can affect your entire skiing style.  So for me there has been a direct correlation between the number of falls and my effort to not simply stay the same but to improve. 

 

Amazingly, along with all of the falls I've also found myself having much more fun!  Luckily the falls haven't resulted in anything too serious to date (though I did have a pretty hairy eject when I rammed the tip of one of my skiis into an unseen death cookie a couple of weeks ago.  Never had a ski eject on me like that going straight forward before).

 

So go to ESA and you too can fall more!  biggrin.gif 

post #187 of 265

Less than once a day here. When I'm doing groomers or sticking to the marked trails, it's very rarely as a fall can be painful and the subsequent slide taking seconds to complete.  When we have powder days here I'll tumble at least 3x a day; as it doesn't hurt, it's fun and gives me a chance to enjoy another aspect of snow (reminding me what it was like to be a kid).  Powder allows me to safely push your boundaries with a smaller chance of serious bodily harm.

 

Falling in the lift line, getting smacked into by an out of control skier/boarder, etc. shouldn't really count.  Basically if you're going less than 5 mph, it's just a brain fart.

post #188 of 265

Working on my mogul skills ( or lack threoff) and not falling but quick slide on just about every run. Nothing spectacular not even  binding release but it's a good thing I have Gortex pants

When not on bumps no falls unless someone or something gets in the way at mach schnell

post #189 of 265

Some retard cut in front of me today last second when I was on a line for a jump, the guy cuts across the bottom of the jump  I asked him what the ---- he was doing

post #190 of 265

popcorn.gif

post #191 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovethesteeps View Post

Last week I downsized my boot shell but forgot to adjust my bindings.  

 



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post #192 of 265


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lovethesteeps View Post

Last week I downsized my boot shell but forgot to adjust my bindings.  

 

Ski'd for a few hours at Canyons on Saturday and my boots popped right into the binding at the start of the day, so I wasn't aware I was in any kind of danger.  Ski'd for a few hours with no problems until my ski suddenly popped off at the top of the mountain without the binding releasing on a turn.  I didn't fall and just thought, well that's odd, I guess I should take it easy until I get down the mountain and have it checked out.  

 

At the time I was approaching the very top of a steep black groomer in the shade, icy hardpack with about an inch of fresh powder on top because it was snowing.   Sure enough at the top of the run my ski popped off, I went down and slid *all the way down the trail* at a fairly scary speed, head first on my right side, trees whizzing past me about 2-3 feet away.  I couldn't believe how far I slid without even slowing down, must have been 1/4 mile or so at least.  It really felt like one of those epic Super G wipeouts you see on TV.  I was going fast enough that I didn't dare try slowing myself down with hands or feet without risking injury.  

 

Luckily someone else saw the fall and brought my ski down to the bottom for me.  It would have been literally impossible to get back up that slope otherwise and retrieve my ski.  To give you an idea how far I slid, it took them a good couple of minutes or so to get down the hill skiing cautiously while holding my ski.  Other than a baseball sized raspberry on my back where my jacket and powder skirt slid up until I was sliding on bare skin, and a really sore shoulder the next day, I wasn't hurt.  

 

Needless to say, I won't ever make that mistake again!  A few feet in the other direction and I'm not sure my helmet would have done much to protect me from ramming into a tree head first at about 40 Mph whilst sliding down steep icy hardpack!


My wife doesn't ski any more, so about five years ago I decided to reposition the bindings on her Dynastar MPI TRs to fit my boots. Turns out they fit perfectly as is. (Her boots must've been way too big.) The boot sole center mark on my boots went right over the mark on the skis. Forward pressure was just right and everything. After skiing on them for about half a day without incident, including some short modest bump runs, I remembered while riding the lift that the bindings were still set for someone about 70 pounds lighter than me. I got off the lift, made a few turns and walked out of the bindings. Couldn't stay in them all the way down the hill. Got to the bottom and went hunting for a screwdriver. After getting them set properly, I never fell with those skis again. A classic case of "what you don't know won't hurt you".

post #193 of 265

I've fallen...and I can't get up.

 

fallen.jpg

post #194 of 265

Haaaaa!!

post #195 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by bullhorn View Post

I don't buy into the "if you don't fall your not skiing hard enough or close enough to the edge of your ability".  If having your butt on the ground is your only feedback that you are doing something wrong then you aren't a very good skier.  (or at least not a very perseptive one).  I don't fall that often, but i can sure tell when i'm out of balance or when my ski is not going where i planned them to go.


I agree with this. I don't think one should be falling very often at all. This year: 15-20 days: one major fall due to hitting submerged tree, one double ejection in deep powder over a rollover,  a few butt slides in the trees, no other "crashes" out of control, losing skis and all that.

I used to buy into the "push to you fall" thing, but not anymore, and I ski fairly fast, so if I fall doing it, it's going to hurt. I think judgement and looking ahead are key to staying out of the hospital.

OTOH, so many skiers are so poorly aligned on their gear, with poorly fitting boots (as I used to be) that they can't help it. Before I got properly aligned, balanced fore and aft and canted, a road was a scary thing, so I feel for most skiers out there. It's very hard to get your gear set up well.

Be careful out there!
 

post #196 of 265

Damn, this is getting to be a habbit.

 

My last fall happened when laying into a GS turn, really pressuring the tip, trying to make it into a SL turn, near the end of the day as the little bumps (not moguls, just the way the smooth groomers evolve during the day) were getting bigger and the outside ski (Volkl P50F1) ran over a bump and got flexed way inside - toe release (better than knee release).

 

This one happened after I was just admiring how much sturdier my Vollant Machete Gs were in the same conditions and didn't fold up when they hit a bump.

 

I was doing my best to carve a very clean hard gs turn where one black (local ratings)  run intersected a blue, so I could carry enough momentum to ski up the blue to another black(ish) run that peeled off the blue a little higher up the hill.  It seems I was paying a little too much attention to looking for traffic coming down the blue onto which I was merging and not enough attention to the bump where the two trails met.  I had done the same route a few times, but this time my line was a little higher and the bump where the two runs met a little bigger.  When the impact came, my outside ski's heel released, inside ski caught and SLAM!   I had just enough time to do a front breakfall (helmet still made a little contact with snow despite my best efforts).

 

I have trouble sitting up to get out of bed; I accidentally leaned against a shelf the other day and recoiled in pain; I can't use my left arm with any force or much on my right;  I had to take two trips to get my groceries up to the fourth floor;  it took me 15 minutes to scrape the ice off the car window yesterday;  I'm guessing I got bruised ribs a bruised lung on that side, and a possible hematoma.  No visible external bruising yet though.

 

post #197 of 265

Damn, this is getting to be a habit.

 

My last fall happened when laying into a GS turn, really pressuring the tip, trying to make it into a SL turn, near the end of the day as the little bumps (not moguls, just the way the smooth groomers evolve during the day) were getting bigger and the outside ski (Völkl P50F1) ran over a bump and got flexed way inside - toe release (better than knee release).

 

This one happened after I was just admiring how much sturdier my Volant Machete Gs were in the same conditions and didn't fold up when they hit a bump.

 

I was doing my best to carve a very clean hard gs turn where one black (local ratings)  run intersected a blue, so I could carry enough momentum to ski up the blue to another black(ish) run that peeled off the blue a little higher up the hill.  It seems I was paying a little too much attention to looking for traffic coming down the blue onto which I was merging and not enough attention to the bump where the two trails met.  I had done the same route a few times, but this time my line was a little higher and the bump where the two runs met a little bigger.  When the impact came, my outside ski's heel released, inside ski caught and SLAM!   I had just enough time to do a front breakfall (helmet still made a little contact with snow despite my best efforts).

 

I have trouble sitting up to get out of bed; I accidentally leaned against a shelf the other day and recoiled in pain; I can't use my left arm with any force or much on my right;  I had to take two trips to get my groceries up to the fourth floor;  it took me 15 minutes to scrape the ice off the car window yesterday;  I'm guessing I got bruised ribs a bruised lung on that side, and a possible hematoma.  No visible external bruising yet though.

post #198 of 265

Sorry Ghost, I hope you heal quickly!

post #199 of 265

lovethesteeps and everyone else who "loves the steeps" should learn and practice self arrest.

 

Ghost, I hope you're only bruised. Get well soon. If you love the thrill of speed, usually ski alone, on small hills, you might think about switching to Telemark. You can go "scary fast" at much lower (safer) speeds with free heels. It will make the runs more challenging and they will seem longer and steeper. The only downside is keeping up with others, but on small hill, they won't have to wait at the bottom too long. :)

post #200 of 265

I agree that there is a big difference between crashing - ejecting the skis, and just sliding sideways on a mogul run for example.

 

Skiing reckless, and out of control, crashing several times per day is not very smart, and I guess it wont make you a better skier.

I very rarely fall while skiing groomed runs, but I often slide sideways while skiing steep moguls, or powder trees, and it makes me want to do the same line again until I master it.

 

I never had a serious injury from skiing,  although I try to push hard and take the most from my usually short ski seasons. But in my opinion falling and crashing is part of improving your skiing, You will never learn to ski powder or moguls without falling. You learn with your mistakes.

But if you double eject several times per day, and ski faster than your ability, putting other people at risk, then you should reconsider your skiing, and maybe have a few classes...

post #201 of 265

damn, ghost, that sucks. a couple things strike a familiar chord with me. a run you do an hour earlier can change dramatically, though we may assume it's as we skied it last time down, and you know what a.s.s.u.m.e. means. One day some kids turned a little bump IN the run into a kicker, and I never saw it coming in flat light.

 

also, looking away from your line to sort out the traffic (which is required now and then) can cause a crash, eeeeasy. 

 

Is it possible that hyper awareness of others, as encouraged here, can actually be bad for your health? I hope you are not discouraged in continuing to rip icon14.gif.

 

that sounds like a whole bottle of ibuprofin to me.

post #202 of 265

Earlier this season, I switched skis toward the end of the day, and I didn't realize that I never dialed in my din on the skis I was putting on.  The din was dialed all the way down.  The skis ripped off on my first three runs while I was simply making hard turns (one of these included a lost ski in the trees. I found it after a good 30 mins of searching). I took it really easy after these three ejections.  Once I realized my stupidity, I was pretty upset with myself.  I guess these things happen after returning from a near decade hiatus. Thankfully I wasn't hurt in any of these falls.

post #203 of 265

As a beginner-low intermediate, I fall 1 to 3 times a day, if not more.  However, if I don't fall I am not really learning or trying new things.  My instructor told me I fell "well" during a lesson.  When I asked what she meant, she said that I fall forward, which means I was trying new things and aggressively attacking the mountain.  It brought a smile to my face.  As they say "You ain't falling, you ain't trying".  Besides I always get a laugh out of a fall!

 

Happy trails!
Mario

post #204 of 265

I feel that I should explain my ideas about falling.

I've had some serious injuries as a result of falling; my last one was a broken greater tuberosity of my humerus, resulting from tips sticking in soft snow, bindings releasing, and me falling forward. I avoided facial / head injuries by rotating my body, but caught the tip of my shoulder, thus beaking my arm. That was in March 2004.

While recovering I realized that I only got injured when I fell; I never collide with trees, fences, rocks, lift towers or other people. And so I decided to make it a priority: don't fall.

I did fall once when I first got my GS 9's; got one of them caught in a rut in dense packed powder. And at least once on my twin tips (switching, not jibbing); but otherwise, since 2004, no falls, no injuries.

I decided not to get injured again, and the way I'm doing it is by not falling. Our decisions are constrained by how much we care about ourselves.

post #205 of 265

Ghost, hope you get back on the slopes soon. Sucks. And suspect you're right; you may have spent a millisecond too long checking out traffic. But you had no choice. That's the constant issue trying to ski fast and well on public slopes. 

post #206 of 265

Thanks Beyond,

No worries, I won't miss any time on snow; I wouldn't let a little thing like bruised or cracked ribs keep me from skiing.  Although, I may use a little less counter this coming weekend.  Getting the boots on and off will be the hard part.


Edited by Ghost - 2/5/11 at 4:00pm
post #207 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post
that sounds like a whole bottle of ibuprofin to me.


I will admit to having an extra shot of Jack Danial's when I got home.  biggrin.gif

post #208 of 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
  Getting the boots on and off will be the hard part.


That's been my issue, tightening the buckles on the left boot.  Getting better at it though.

post #209 of 265

Heal up!  Good snow is on the way

post #210 of 265

I like to have a positive attitude about falling. It is part of the learning process.  I like to push myself on a snowy, powdery day, so I have a nice cushion to land on when I do fall.  I think "falling" across the skis is the cornerstone of learning, and building up that confidence to project yourself across the skis allows for many of the other elements of technique to fall into place :-) Nice pun, huh?

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