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What are my poles for? - Page 2

post #31 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by crofrog View Post

So, I started thinking about this again once the thread was pumped up again this year. I was playing with my fore-aft balance some this year and was finding a slight heel weighting at the turn finish would really put some power into the tails, but that I was having problems getting diagonally across the skis to get into the next turn.

 

So I started working with the poles allot more. I found that the reach for the next plant seemed to help me move diagonally across onto the new edges, and defiantly added some rhythm that was lacking before.



That reach of the pole plant causes movement of the Latissimus Dorsi muscle. It gives you the opportunity to gain leverage and balance, assisting in an early edge/pressure of the ski in the top of the new turn. Keep your elbows in and your hands in front.

muscles_human_body_back.jpg

post #32 of 48

So as a skier, you're getting rid of the one thing that makes snowboarders insanely jealous (on traverses)?
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post

If you have poles......you are using them.  Maybe not for anything though.  I say loose the poles!  Boarders don't need them.  Neither do skiers.  Once you loose them, you will never want them again.  It's a huge freedom.  Plus you might learn how to stay stacked, and ripp some gnarly full on carves!  Have fun, loose the poles.



 

post #33 of 48

jzmtl,

Sorry, depending on the terrain it is not always a light touch.  Infact, I use them so hard that I have stayed with my allsop shock absorbers (prevents sprained wrist.). This may sound extreme but on steep moguls you will have to use good, solid and well timed pole plants, sometimes like you are fencing with the bumps.. 

 

Back to the basic questions.  The best time to learn what to do with your poles is 5 minutes after you stop snow plowing.  Proper use of poles in the early stage may be only planting them lightly and occasionally, but it is all about proper stance with your hands out in front for both balance and using them perpendicular to the downhill slope to keep your shoulders pointing downhill.  I know this is no longer an absolute with todays shaped skis and if you only stick to the groomers.  But if you have any desire to Ski moguls, trees and deep powder, the balance, timing and forward stance that poles bring about can't be underestimated. 

 

Best advice, never ditch the poles and always do some practicing to work them into the timing of your turns.

 

The best thing I heard in this forum was that you can't run well with your hands in your pocket,  Poles are definitely the same thing.  As the terrain gets harder you will need them.

     

post #34 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

So as a skier, you're getting rid of the one thing that makes snowboarders insanely jealous (on traverses)?
 



 

Spoken like a true Slider.

post #35 of 48

crofrog, you have discovered what all good pre-shaped ski skiers knew.  You have to get your weight transfered forward and thus you are flexing the ski and reducing the amount of ski edge that contacts the surface and at the same time you have slightly unweighted yourself from the surface. 

 

Both of these allow you to turn quickly and easily from the lower half of your body. 

 

For some us old school people we sometimes forget that we're on shaped skis and practically spin ourselfs around in a circle!!!!!

post #36 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

So as a skier, you're getting rid of the one thing that makes snowboarders insanely jealous (on traverses)?

 



Yes, I guess.  I see more skiers without poles.  Seems more popular.  On a traverse you just step up if you need to.  Still better than a board!  One of our friends broke out his front teeth with his pole the other day.  I see a lot of young park, and pipe riders doing without as well.  They kill it.  Be good!

 

post #37 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foreveryoung View Post

jzmtl,

Sorry, depending on the terrain it is not always a light touch.  Infact, I use them so hard that I have stayed with my allsop shock absorbers (prevents sprained wrist.). This may sound extreme but on steep moguls you will have to use good, solid and well timed pole plants, sometimes like you are fencing with the bumps.. 

 


Yes, but for the purpose of this thread that's beyond the scope and the OP can start that when he needs to. Speaking from experience when I started a few years back, too much info that's not needed right then is overwhelming and not helping.
post #38 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by swimbaby26 View Post

Honestly I insist on poles because it occupies my hands and makes me feel safe.  Not sure that's the wisest thing, but I like the idea of having them to poke at snow if I'm about to fall even though I'm not sure this is how I fall anyway.  It helps to move on flat ground, but other than that, I'd prefer it very much over waving my hands around.  As a beginner too, I'd say poles are great stress balls - never did a pole plant intentionally and I'm not even sure what that is yet, but man I will not part with poles just because I don't use them.



If you start gripping your poles tighly, you will be tensing your whole body. You need to stay loose to stay in balance and ready to move.

 Use your poles to remind you to keep your hands forward, but relax the grip...

 

post #39 of 48

Cone on, everyone knows God gave skiers poles with pointy ends so we can keep out of control boarders from taking our our knees!  eek.gif

post #40 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by bplatt03443 View Post

Cone on, everyone knows God gave skiers poles with pointy ends so we can keep out of control boarders from taking our our knees!  eek.gif



As I watched my wife do twice just yesterday. rolleyes.gif

post #41 of 48

poles are for stopping little french/italian/austrian kids from pushing in in the lift line,

post #42 of 48

Do they have to be French/Italian/Austrian?   Or can we also use 'em on kids here in America?

post #43 of 48

I don't remember Austrian kids cutting in line. Do they?

post #44 of 48

acefb403_ski+pole+flask.JPG

post #45 of 48
Prickly,
The little runts have been bred to push in, you block them off with you're poles and they look up at you as if you're in the wrong,

tch, yes give them a dig with the poles stateside as well, no one will blame you
post #46 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foreveryoung View Post

Sorry, depending on the terrain it is not always a light touch.  Infact, I use them so hard that I have stayed with my allsop shock absorbers (prevents sprained wrist.). This may sound extreme but on steep moguls you will have to use good, solid and well timed pole plants, sometimes like you are fencing with the bumps.. 


Jeez, I must be skiing bumps wrong!  "Good" and "well timed" yes, but nailing 'em so hard I need shock absorbers - no, thanks! I'll take the pole touch most of the time, including on MJ's bumps, with only the occasional "solid" pole plant.

 

Years ago, I did "solid" pole plants. I used those poles with platforms on the bottoms of the grips. At the end of the day, the side of my hand would be sore from slamming into the platform. It was a symptom of, um, issues with my skiing technique, to put it mildly.

 

These days, a "solid" pole plant is almost impossible on a good day because the snow is too soft, even in the bumps.

 

Some have said a pole touch is like a trigger for other moves, and it's a good analogy, at least in some ways. Squeeze the trigger gently, and your chance of hitting the target improves. Yank on it abruptly, and control deteriorates.

 

Ski on your feet, not your poles. Except for certain special applications, it should indeed be a light touch, regardless of terrain.

 

 

post #47 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

For me it's all about timing.  I do find on occasion that I forget to actually use them, which usually coincides with me not skiing as well.



Ditto to this!

post #48 of 48
Thread Starter 

So, this year I've been working the "blocking pole plant" in the bumps and really short radius turns, and trying to get the "quiet upper body" with my hands in front of me. I've noticed that when I stop thinking about these techinques even if Im not pole planting my inside shoulder tends to drop and I loose site of my hands and my turns don't finish as nicely and the next set of edges is harder to find.

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