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Not sure if my skis are waxed correctly

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I have done 2 passes of hot scrape and 1 cold scrape with regular paraffin wax; 1 cold scrape using soft ski wax and 1 cold scrape with all temperature wax. 

 

Now after brushing, the ski base looks almost the same as before.  The only place I can see and feel "waxed" are the few spot I have missed with brushing.  Is this normal?  Should a properly waxed ski looks and feel shining and waxy?

 

Thanks.

post #2 of 7

Sounds right to me. Are they shiny?

post #3 of 7

While I'm not a Ski tech, I do my own wax.  It started as science, and now is an art.  One thing that goes across the board; so to speak is the Ptex texture needs to be visible for a great glide.

 

I took my lovelies to a new local shop for a full tune, and unfortunately it was between dressings on their stone.  Along with unseasonably warm temps followed by the usual subzero cold, my boards were stickier than a porcupine at a dog park.

 

Returning to the aforementioned shop, I complained and got a full resurface that is gloriously coarse, and the wax burns off like rollerskates at the rink.

 

Tip, keep the bases wet, but before you soak the Ptex, hit it with Zardoz which sucks into the pores, and then the pores hold the wax longer.  All Temp wax to start, then add layers of appropriate temps as you go along.  The more you apply, scrape, cork, and brush, the better off you are.

 

PS I put a bit of zardoz in between repetitions of brushing, wiping, and corking, by the time I'm done the skis glide everywhere as if I'm on ball bearings.

post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the quick update.  Zardoz sounds interesting, maybe on multi day trips.

 

The base are not shinny, more like dull and blackish.  It's still brand new so there are clear grooved texture running along the ski length.  I actually don't care much about how fast they run, just want to protect and keep them running longer.  Do I need do a few more round or that's about it?

 

Thanks.

 

post #5 of 7

Sounds like the skis needed a better brushing before the wax regiment.  You can try next time by brushing with a coarser brush to open up the base structure and make the skis better able to absorb and retain wax.  Then follow the steps you did above and examine the base at completion.  With a good wax job, you'll be able to see the base structure.  Test with water.  

post #6 of 7

If durability is your concern, as it should be for a new ski, it is best to get as much cold hard wax into your base as possible rather than an all temp or wax of the day.  A cold hard wax will protect your base for much longer.  My school of thought is much like yours, the most important part of wax is the mere presence.  If I'm not racing I don't need to shave hundreths, I just need to glide well and protect my base.  So here is the key to using a cold hard wax, you need to alternate it with layers of soft warm wax.  Maybe a couple hot scrapes then let a layer of warm wax fully cool (not outside, let it cool slowly), then scrape and brush well and go to a hard wax and let fully cool.  Scrape, brush and reapply the soft wax, scrape brush.  Finally back to a hard wax.  It is good to reheat this last layer a couple times after it cools.  When you do you last scrape and brush your base will be so shiny you may see your reflection.  I definitely did not create this method, it was actually designed by Toko race tech for nordic skiing.  For racing, of course there would be very specific temp control, a wax of the day, and a lot more hotscrapes in the beginning but this is what they recommend for a new (or freshly ground) ski.  The reasoning for the alternating layers was that a warm soft wax penetrates much easier than the hard wax which results in more completely full pores with no air trapped.  When you then apply the hard wax it begins to mix and eventually switch places with the soft wax because of the density.  This results in your skis pores being full of a hard durable wax that will last for days.  If I do this to a freshly ground ski it will still be a deep shiny black after 5+ days on the hill (Pacific Northwest Snow).  Old/manmade snow will cut that down a bit.  A shiny ski is a fast ski.   I tried to find the manual i found this in but with no luck.  I think Dawgcatching may have posted it here when I showed it to him last year but I'm new to the site and don't know how to dig it up.  To address the original question, you should be scraping and brushing everything that is visible off.  Make sure your scraped is sharp and flat.  Brush with nylon or soft copper.  Horse hair is good if you have a dull scraper because it does a lot of work but it is therefore aggressive.

post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmourati View Post

Sounds like the skis needed a better brushing before the wax regiment.  You can try next time by brushing with a coarser brush to open up the base structure and make the skis better able to absorb and retain wax.  Then follow the steps you did above and examine the base at completion.  With a good wax job, you'll be able to see the base structure.  Test with water.  



For sure.

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