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Best ski for hardpack and ice/icy conditions in Colorado.

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hello all,

 

As always, I get the best info here and really appreciate all of your feedback.  I'm 6'2 and 215#, advanced skier, and ski Blizzard The Ones with a Griffon binding and Enforcer boot here in Colorado. 

 

I absolutely love the Blizzards - great, great ski!!!  However, maybe it's me, maybe it's the ski, but they are not great on super hardpack and ice/icy conditions.  They wash out (tail slides considerably) in turns and I'm not a fan of that.  Once again, this is not to be interpreted that they are a bad ski - these are great for what they were built to do!

 

With that said, could you all recommend a few skis that would be great for those extremely hardpack and icy days?  Kendos appear to be the leader in my mind but that's why I am here asking you experts.  A bonus in the ski would be when snow comes in for the day and I can get off trail and the ski handles it decently.

 

Thanks all !

Steve 

post #2 of 12

Try the Kastle MX 78 or 88 !

post #3 of 12

I've skied that ski on just those conditions in Colorado - I thought it was borderline awesome on ice for such a fat ski.  I believe we have an "indian not the arrow" situation, BUT I will say that binding mount position can greatly affect edge grip for individual skiers. 

 

What length The Ones are you on?

 

What CO mountains are you skiing?

post #4 of 12

your huge and the blizzard is kindao f soft....

 

with that said with sharp edge it rips the hardest snow youd see in colorado if you have the 184.

post #5 of 12

I second the love for Blizzard. Been on Supersonics, Cronus and now  Titan Argos. I have the '09 version which is a beefy crudbuster. Plenty stiff even at 101mm to hold an edge. Got them last year but skied them for the first time two weeks ago after a 20" dump in Maine. I was amazed how seamlessly they transitioned from deep crud to windblown crust. The current version is, I read, a very different animal in 105mm. Ones I have are available on Ebay for way cheaper than Kastle:

 

 

http://cgi.ebay.com/New-2009-Blizzard-Titan-Argos-IQ-Powder-Skis-187cm-/230462618891?pt=Skiing&hash=item35a8a47d0b

 

You may find this does it all. Highly recommended.

Good luck,

David

 

 

Here is a great deal - with bindings: http://www.powder7.com/sale-skis/model/Blizzard-Titan-Argos-IQ-Skis-187cm-New-2009

post #6 of 12

Kastle mx78s work great for me here in CO when I'm skiing the front and things are firm.

 

post #7 of 12
Quote:
could you all recommend a few skis that would be great for those extremely hardpack and icy days?

Not that we really get "extremely hardpack and icy days" in Colorado--don't you read the marketing material?--but for hard snow, the best no compromise skis are race skis or race-like skis, hands down. All others are a compromise. Many here may tell you otherwise, and try to convince you that wider skis, cap skis, even reverse camber or "early rise" skis carve and hold "just as well," but don't believe them. If it's ice you want to ski, you need a ski made for skiing ice. That's a race ski, and it will need to be very well tuned and--most importantly--well piloted.

Of course, again, we really rarely get snow that hard in Colorado. Most decent, well-tuned skis in the 60's to mid 70's (millimeters) underfoot will do a decent job on pretty much any of the firmer conditions we get in Colorado. If you want a "more versatile" ski, some wider skis that thrive in soft snow and powder may get you to the bottom of the hill on harder snow. But is that the point? If you want to really enjoy the ride, to experience the effortlessly sensuous g-forces of real turns, you need a ski that will do more than just get you back to the lift. Nothing will deliver that feedback like a true high-performance race-like ski.

Unfortunately, the way most recreational skiers ski--that is to say 90 to 99%, depending on the mountain--no ski will work for them on ice. It's not so much a question of skill--not a question of how well they do what they do. It's a question of purpose, or intent--a question of what they are trying to do in the first place. I've expounded on these things in detail many times in the last decade here at EpicSki, and I won't repeat it here. But suffice it to say, I have to chuckle when, on those few "loud powder" days that we do have in Colorado, I overhear so many skiers blaming their equipment for their troubles. "I've got to get my edges sharpened," they say. Perhaps so, but in most cases, if their edges were sharp enough to hold, they wouldn't be able to "turn" (meaning, twist the skis into a skid) at all.

So, without a very good understanding of how to make skis work on hard snow, without skiing with the right tactics and "purpose," and without a very highly developed sense of "touch," there is not a ski made that will let anyone excel on ice. If you have all those things, a race ski will do it best. But if you have all those things, I'll bet you already know that!

Best regards,
Bob Barnes
post #8 of 12
PS: Good information can be found here:

500

wink.gif
post #9 of 12

icon14.gif  another great BB post!

post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by ghostrider23233 View Post

Hello all,

 

As always, I get the best info here and really appreciate all of your feedback.  I'm 6'2 and 215#, advanced skier, and ski Blizzard The Ones with a Griffon binding and Enforcer boot here in Colorado. 

 

I absolutely love the Blizzards - great, great ski!!!  However, maybe it's me, maybe it's the ski, but they are not great on super hardpack and ice/icy conditions.  They wash out (tail slides considerably) in turns and I'm not a fan of that.  Once again, this is not to be interpreted that they are a bad ski - these are great for what they were built to do!

 

With that said, could you all recommend a few skis that would be great for those extremely hardpack and icy days?  Kendos appear to be the leader in my mind but that's why I am here asking you experts.  A bonus in the ski would be when snow comes in for the day and I can get off trail and the ski handles it decently.

 

Thanks all !

Steve 


Hi Steve,

 

I just sold an Epicskier a pair of Fischer Motive 84's for just that situation (Winter Park, firm bumps, no new snow conditions) to add to her quiver, which consisted primarily of wide skis. She found it to be just the ticket (see her review; Segbrown is the user handle, review is 2/3 of the way down the thread:  http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/99308/2011-fischer-motive-84-and-motive-80-full-length-reviews  )

 

Also, for people in your position, customers of mine (this season) have been very happy on the kastle MX78 or MX88, Elan Apex, Dynastar Sultan 85, Blizzard Magnum 8.1, Blizzard Magnum 8.7, Stockli XXL and VXL, Elan 82Xti Waveflex.  Outside of those skis, I would recommend the Kendo from Volkl , Nordica HR Jet Fuel i-Core, and Salomon Enduro as some of the better ones that I have skied.  

 

If you like the Blizzard feel, you can get the Magnum 8.1 and be VERY happy (I own the 8.1 and have skied The One quite a bit; we it in our demo).  That ski rips: it holds better than The One, seems to have a more even flex in bumps, is more stable, and better in bumps (downsides are mostly in choppy, off-piste conditions compared to The One: it is more demanding, no doubt in those conditions).  The One and the 8.1 make a very versatile 2-ski quiver that covers most conditions.

 

The other skis, I would rate in terms of bump performance:

 

-Very good: Stockli VXL, Stockli XXL, Elan Apex, Sollie Enduro, Fischer Motive 84

-Good: Elan 82Xti, Magnum 8.1 and 8.7, Sultan 85, Kastle MX78 and MX88, Nordica Jet Fuel, Volkl Kendo (most of these are a touch stiffer than the others)

 

You out-weigh me by quite a bit, and expect that you would find some of the stiffer skis just fine in bumps as well.  

 

Good luck with your search. 

 

What I look for from a ski in that situation is that it is nimble, stable, has some power on firm snow (more fun that way) but doesn't push me around in bumps or off-piste.  All of those skis do this to some degree, although a few I found to be better than the others.  

Full selection of 2014 skis available right now from Dawgcatching.com.  PM for current deals and discount codes: save up to 25% on mid-season deals. 

Reply
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by ghostrider23233 View Post

Hello all,

 

As always, I get the best info here and really appreciate all of your feedback.  I'm 6'2 and 215#, advanced skier, and ski Blizzard The Ones with a Griffon binding and Enforcer boot here in Colorado. 

 

I absolutely love the Blizzards - great, great ski!!!  However, maybe it's me, maybe it's the ski, but they are not great on super hardpack and ice/icy conditions.  They wash out (tail slides considerably) in turns and I'm not a fan of that.  Once again, this is not to be interpreted that they are a bad ski - these are great for what they were built to do!

 

With that said, could you all recommend a few skis that would be great for those extremely hardpack and icy days?  Kendos appear to be the leader in my mind but that's why I am here asking you experts.  A bonus in the ski would be when snow comes in for the day and I can get off trail and the ski handles it decently.

 

Thanks all !

Steve 


 

Steve, the ski is probably fine.  It's the tuning, and the skier that make it.  Ice requires the most talent to keep a carve on.  I crappy tune, ie detuned tips or tails. A crappy tune from a machine will not help you either.  A fine hand tuning will go a long way, to all the way to help you.  A machine tune is like putting crappy tires on your sports car, then expecting it to handle a curve!

Good luck to you.  A killer tune by hand takes hours of work in the hand of an artist.  You can learn to do it yourself. 

 

Atomic Arc Ambition
 

post #12 of 12

Steve,

 

You may want to consider the Fischer Progressor 9+ for the conditions you describe, typical Midwest conditions.  I stepped into my wife's Progressor's two days ago and now understand why a lot of the NASTAR racers here in Wisconsin love them.  Turns are easy to initiate but the ski is stable and holds a turn like nobody's business, with no washout in the tails.  I was able to go much faster and still carve, and I'm a solid but not great skier.  Keep a fair amount of forward pressure and hold on for the ride.

 

Note:  I have no idea how they handle crud.

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